People from all walks of lives celebrate ‘Rakhi Bandhan’ festival in North Bengal

Report by: 
SOUMYA DE SARKAR, PRASHANT ACHARYA
MALDA/ NORTH DINAJPUR
26 Aug 2018

Auspicious ‘Rakhi Bandhan’ festival was observed in unique ways across three districts of Gour Banga today. Political parties to charitable organizations conveyed the message of harmony and fraternity to people mostly overlooked by the elite society.
Youth Trinamool Congress workers led by their district president and a member of chairman-in-council of English Bazaar civic body Amlan Bhaduri rushed to red-light area in English Bazaar to respond to invitation of the sex-workers this morning. The women living at the red-light area greeted the Trinamool workers and tied knots of brotherhood on their wrists.
“It was a brilliant experience. Those women spend life amid distress. Today’s programme brought smile to their faces. We offered them sweets and promised to be at their help whenever they want,” Bhaduri said.
District primary school council (DPSC) chairman and another member of chairman-in-council of English Bazaar civic body Asis Kundu spent the morning with members of Harijan community. The girls of the community greeted Kundu and his associates by offering them Rakhi and sweets.
“The Harijan community works relentlessly to keep our town clean despite all their hardships. However, their services are not always properly evaluated. Celerbrating ‘Rakhi bandha’ festival with them is indeed a pleasant experience,” Kundu said.
Nihar Ghosh, MLA and civic body chief of English Bazaar civic body and Dulal Sarkar, vice- chairman of the municipality held a programme at Foara More where they tied knots of rakhis to the citizens. Arnab Ghosh, superintendent of police received rakhis from women police personnel whom he offered sweets in return.
Kids receiving education at a school at Atghara village of Kaliaganj block in North Dinajpur observed the day in a unique way. Kids of the school run by Viswa Hindu Math tied rakhis to trees to symbolize the harmony between nature and human beings. They also tied rakhis to horns of cows as a gesture of gratefulness to the animal benefitting the mankind in numerous ways.